Dictionary D

discrepancy

Synonym for "nonconformance" and "nonconformity (2)".

References:

discrepant material

Material that does not conform to specifications.

References:

EIA-557-A, 7/95

discrete (semiconductor) device

A semiconductor device that is specified to perform an elementary electronic function and is not divisible into separate components functional in themselves.

NOTE 1 Diodes, transistors, rectifiers, thyristors, and multiple versions of these devices are examples. Other semiconductor structures having the physical complexity of integrated circuits but performing elementary electronic functions (e.g., complex Darlington transistors) are usually considered to be discrete semiconductor devices.

NOTE 2 If a semiconductor device is not considered to be an integrated circuit in both complexity and functionality, it is considered to be a discrete device.

References:

JESD77-B, 2/00
JESD99B, 5/07

discretionary wiring

A technique for interconnecting subarrays on a single wafer in which each subarray is electrically tested by probing and the desired array function is attained by the use of a metallization pattern that connects only usable subarrays.

References:

JESD99B, 5/07

discrimination

The ability of the measuring equipment to differentiate between characteristic values. The equipment discrimination should be small (e.g., less than 10%) compared to the process variability and/or control limits.

References:

JEP132, 7/98

disk-button package

A package shaped like a disk or button whose terminals exit radially from the periphery of the disk (like spokes of a wheel) or axially from the center of the disk.

References:

JESD30D, 7/06

dislocation

An atomic imperfection or fault in the crystalline lattice structure.

NOTE 1 The two types are edge dislocations (if a row of atoms is removed or displaced and the slippage is at right angles to the displacement) and screw dislocations (if the slippage is parallel).

NOTE 2 If dislocations appear at the surface of the crystal, they are sometimes referred to as surface dislocations.

References:

JESD99B, 5/07

displacement damage

Displacement of atoms in the silicon lattice caused by their interaction with incident neutrons, protons, or other energetic particles or ions.

References:

JEP133B, 3/05

disposition

The act of determining the future use of nonconforming material, e.g., scrap, use-as-is, retest, rework, other.

References:

JESD671-A, 6/97

dissolution of termination metallization; leaching

The loss or removal of metallization from an area on the basis or substrate material during immersion in molten solder.

References:

J-STD-002B, 2/03

distributed delay model

A model constructed from primitive models, each having specified delay.

References:

JESD12-1B, 8/93
JESD99B, 5/07

DOE

See "design of experiments".

References:

dopant

A chemical element that is introduced into the lattice structure as an impurity to form desired properties.

NOTE Examples are phosphorus and boron used to create n- and p-regions, respectively, in silicon.

References:

JESD99B, 5/07

dose rate burnout

The catastrophic failure of a circuit caused by the very large currents produced by a high-intensity pulse of ionizing radiation.

References:

JEP133B, 3/05

dose rate upset

The disruption of a device caused by a high-intensity pulse of ionizing radiation that produces a change in stored data, a change of operating state, or a transient output signal that is large enough to affect other circuit elements.

References:

JEP133B, 3/05

double word

A character string or binary element string that, in a given system, has twice the length of a word.

References:

JESD100-B, 12/99

double-buffered read transfer (DRT)

A read transfer in an array that contains two full SAM data registers that are used alternately. Each one is loaded while the contents of the other is being transferred to the SDQ(n) port. The selection of the two SAM registers is automatic.

References:

JESD21-C, 1/97

double-diffused MOS (DMOS) technology

A technology for producing silicon-gate metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors such that 1) the threshold voltage, VT, is determined by the intersection of two doping profiles, and 2) the device channel length is defined by the diffusion characteristics rather than by a photolithographic self-aligned gate structure.

References:

JESD99B, 5/07

double-sided PCB assembly

A printed circuit board assembly with components mounted on both sides of the board.

References:

JESD22-B111, 7/03

double-way rectifier circuit

A circuit in which the current flows in both directions from each terminal of the alternating-voltage circuit to the rectifier circuit elements connected to each terminal.

NOTE    The terms “single-way” and “double-way” provide a means for describing the effect of the rectifier circuit on current in the transformer windings connected to the rectifier circuits. Most rectifier circuits may be classified into these two general types. Many double-way circuits are also referred to as bridge circuits.

References:

JESD77C, 10/09

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